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Data Definitions

Attendance

A student is considered absent if he or she is not present for the entire school day. Partial days and late arrivals do not count as an absence.

Bachelor’s Degree Attainment Index

The Bachelor’s Degree Attainment Index (Bachelor’s DAI) provides an estimate of the proportion of ninth-graders who will earn a four-year college degree within 10 years of beginning high school. The estimate takes into account students who take a direct path to a 4-year college and students who take alternative routes to a bachelor’s degree, either by delaying college entry or first enrolling in a two-year college. To calculate the Bachelor’s DAI, we use the most recent high school graduation, college enrollment, and college graduation rates available for CPS students. When a degree completion rate for a particular category of students is not calculable for a given school because of insufficient group size, we substitute the district-level degree completion rate for students in the same category.

Bachelor’s Degree Attainment Index Unavailable

There is not enough data to calculate the Bachelor’s Degree Attainment Index, most likely because one or more of the factors is unavailable or suppressed.

College Enrollment

The proportion of graduates who enrolled directly in college in the fall following spring or summer high school graduation, by type of college (two-year or four-year). Data on college enrollment come from the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC), which houses enrollment and graduation records for colleges throughout the United States. This does not include students who delayed college entry.

College Graduation

The proportion of immediate four-year enrollees who earned a bachelor's degree from a four-year college within six years. Data on college graduation comes from the NSC. Students who earned a bachelor’s degree from a different four-year college from where they first enrolled after high school were counted as four-year college graduates. Students who enrolled in a four-year college that does not provide graduation records to the NSC in the fourth through sixth years after high school graduation were not included in these rates, as we were unable to determine if they earned a bachelor’s degree. We did not include graduation rates from two-year colleges because for many students, the NSC data does not indicate whether they completed a certificate or an associate’s degree.

College Persistence

The proportion of students who immediately enrolled in a four-year college and have been continuously enrolled in one or more four-year institutions for four consecutive semesters.

College Types

2-year college

A 2-year college is any post secondary institution that does not offer a bachelor’s degree or higher. This may include certificate or Associates degree-granting institutions.

4-year college

A 4-year college is any post secondary institution that offers a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Comparison Schools

Comparison schools have similar ninth grade students and geographic proximity. These are schools that are expected to have a similar high school graduation rate based on the characteristics their students had when they started high school that matter most for graduating high school. Comparison schools without data are not included in the comparison school average.

Core Courses

Core courses are English and Language Arts, Science, Math and Social Studies.

GPA (Freshman Core GPA)

Freshman core grade point averages (GPAs) are calculated as the unweighted average of a student’s grades in freshman core courses. This includes only courses in Math, English, Science, and Social Studies.

GPA (Cumulative Graduating GPA)

Cumulative graduating grade point averages (GPAs) are calculated as the unweighted average of a student’s entire credit-bearing load. All high school graduation GPA calculations are cumulative and include both core and non-core courses.

High School Graduation

The proportion of first-time ninth-graders who graduate high school in four years, including the summer after their fourth year. A student’s graduation is counted towards the graduation rate of the school where that student began and finished their first year in the school district. For example, a student that began 9th grade in high school A, but transferred to high school B in their second year, will be counted toward the first-time freshmen graduation rate of high school A, even if they graduate from high school B, or any other high school in the district. Students who transfer into CPS high schools are included with their corresponding ninth-grade cohort. Students who transfer out of CPS are not included in the high school graduation rate. The UChicago Consortium and the To&Through Project use a high school graduation rate that has not historically included students who attend options schools (i.e., alternative schools).

Institutional Graduation Rate

The proportion of full-time, first-time college freshmen who earned a bachelor’s degree within six years. Data on institutional graduation rates come from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS), which is collected by the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics.

Insufficient Data for Degree Attainment Index

There is not enough data to calculate the Bachelor’s Degree Attainment Index, most likely because one or more of the factors is unavailable or suppressed.

Left School

Students who transfer outside of the district (both verified and unverified transfers).

Low Outcome

Fewer than 5 or 5 percent of students achieved the outcome, so data is suppressed in order to preserve student anonymity.

Missing OnTrack

Missing on-track data refers to students missing course credit or grade data for one or more semesters. These are often students who transferred into this district from another district or were previously enrolled in a charter school.

N/A

An N/A label means that the data is unavailable.

Not Shown

Fewer than 10 students are in the subgroup, so this rate has been suppressed in order to protect students’ privacy.

On-Track

A student is on-track if he or she fails no more than one semester of a core course and earns at least 5 credits by the end of ninth-grade. The Freshman OnTrack rate does not include ninth-graders who attended charter schools because the district did not receive ninth-grade grades from charter school until recently.

Off-Track

A student is off-track if he or she fails more than one semester of a core course and earns fewer than 5 credits by the end of freshman year.

Qualification Groups

The College Qualifications Frameworks is based on 2006 research from the UChicago Consortium about the academic qualifications of students that make them likely to be accepted to colleges with different levels of selectivity. The framework breaks students into different subgroups based on their graduating GPA and ACT scores. Highly qualified students are likely to be accepted to selective and very selective 4-year colleges, moderately qualified students to somewhat selective and non-selective 4-year colleges, and minimally qualified students to 2-year colleges. The qualification subgroups enable schools to strategically analyze enrollment outcomes for students with different college choices.

Composite ACT Scores Missing ACT < 18 18 – 20 21 – 23 24+ Unweighted GPA in Core Courses < 2.0 2.0–2.4 2.5–2.9 3.0–3.4 3.5–4.0 Highly Qualified Students Moderately Qualified Students Minimally Qualified Students Two-year colleges Two-year colleges Non-selective four-year colleges Non-selective four-year colleges Somewhat selective colleges Somewhat selective colleges Somewhat selective colleges Somewhat selective colleges Somewhat selective colleges Selective colleges Selective colleges Selective colleges Selective / very selective colleges Selective / very selective colleges Selective / very selective colleges Very selective colleges Very selective colleges Selective / very selective colleges Selective / very selective colleges Selective colleges Selective colleges Somewhat selective colleges Somewhat selective colleges Somewhat selective colleges Non-selective four-year colleges

Highly Qualified Students

Seniors whose GPA and ACT scores give them access to selective or very selective four-year colleges (based on Barron’s selectivity categories). [[MORE:qual_groups]]

Moderately Qualified Students

Seniors whose GPA and ACT scores give them access to somewhat selective or non-selective four-year colleges (based on Barron’s selectivity categories). [[MORE:qual_groups]]

Minimally Qualified Students

Seniors whose GPA and ACT scores only give them access to two-year colleges. [[MORE:qual_groups]]

Risk & Opportunity Groups

The Risk and Opportunity Framework is based on 2014 research from the UChicago Consortium about the 8th grade academic characteristics of students that make them likely to be on-track during their freshman year. The framework breaks students into different subgroups based on 8th grade attendance and grades. The subgroups enable schools to strategically analyze how their work is impacting the transition from 8th grade to high school.

8th Grade Attendance ≥ 98% ≥ 95% ≥ 90% ≥ 80% < 80% 8th Grade Core GPA 0–1.0 1.0–2.0 2.0–3.0 3.0–4.0 High Opportunity Opportunity Vulnerable High Risk

High Opportunity Students

Students whose 8th grade attainment means they should be very successful during their freshmen year. These students had at least a 95 percent attendance rate and a 3.0 GPA in eighth grade. [[MORE:opp_groups]]

Opportunity Students

Students whose 8th grade attainment means they should be successful during their freshmen year. These students had at least a 98 percent attendance rate and a 2.0 – 3.0 GPA or a 95 percent to 98 percent attendance rate and at least a 3.0 GPA in eighth grade. [[MORE:opp_groups]]

Vulnerable Students

Students whose 8th grade attainment means they are in danger of failing a class or falling off-track during their freshmen year. During eighth grade, these students fell into one of the following groups: At least a 3.0 GPA and an attendance rate of 80 percent to 90 percent; GPA of 2.0-3.0 and an attendance rate of 90 percent to 95 percent; GPA of 1.0-2.0 and an attendance rate of at least 95 percent. [[MORE:opp_groups]]

High Risk Students

Students whose 8th grade attainment means they are at serious risk of being off-track during their freshmen year. During eighth grade, these students fell into one of the following groups: GPA of 2.0-3.0 and an attendance rate below 90 percent; GPA of 1.0-2.0 and an attendance rate of below 95 percent; A GPA of 0.0-1.0. [[MORE:opp_groups]]

Unexpected Value

An unexpected value was reported. This is an internal error due to an issue in the dataset. Please report the issue to <toandthrough@uchicago.edu>.